sowaka
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2018.11 MAIN OPEN 2019.3 ANNEX OPEN 2018.11 MAIN OPEN 2019.3 ANNEX OPEN

Nostalgic yet new.
A new hotel in Kyoto’s Gion district
where you can truly relax.

The Sanskrit word “sowaka” means “Happy / Best Wishes”
This word of blessing, often used at the end of the Buddhist sutras,
is nostalgic to the ear yet new – and it fits well in Kyoto which has many Buddhist temples.

Once you enter the hotel and walk on the stone floor sprinkled with water, you are in another world enveloped by serenity.
Feast your eyes on the greenery of the courtyard and relax in your room while feeling the rustling of the wind.

Not only is the hotel situated in a wonderful location,
but its greatest charm is its luxurious space combining the nostalgic past with the new.

At the Michelin-starred restaurant you can enjoy creative cuisine distinctive of Kyoto
Take a stroll around town as if you lived here.

Good luck and blessings to the people who come here.
Enjoy to your heart’s content an abundance of good luck at “Sowaka.”

Notice

  • 2018.10.10

    We will open only on weekends until our grand opening, March 2019. Please go to our website to book our rooms.

  • 2018.09.24

    <November 30 and December 1 Only> Autumn night private visit to Kodaiji temple

     

    Kodaiji Temple, five minute walk from SOWAKA, is famous for beautiful autumn foliage. Many people from the world visit the temple especially for light-up autumn leaves at night. Only for guests of SOWAKA, the temple will open for a private visit. Enjoy viewing a fantastic reflection of maple leaves in the pond and night illuminations in the rock garden. It will be a magical, unforgettable experience.

  • 2018.08.02

    This is the official website of a new luxury hotel “Sowaka” in Kyoto’s Gion district. The latest information will be updated here.

Guestrooms A space of hospitality
where you can feel
the spirit of“suki”

In the main building you can feel the sukiya architectural style of an old established restaurant that dates back a hundred years; while the annex is designed in a modern Japanese-style. What both of these spaces have in common is the spirit of “suki” (“refined taste”). “Suki” brings to mind such things as the tea ceremony, but the origin of the phrase is “to like.” Sukiya architectural style originated with the tea ceremony room, which is a house built according to taste; and in order to please guests a tea ceremony room is distinguished for the way it was built – i.e., in a nonconventional style and with playfulness. Each of the spacious “Sowaka” guestrooms has its own charm. The main building offers rooms with the spirit of distinctively Japanese suki inherited from past generations, while the rooms of the annex give the feeling of the suki of the modern age. Please enjoy your stay amid unprecedented style that combines a Japanese aesthetic sense with comfort.
Room details here Room details here Room details here

Cuisine Kyoto's “now”
is offered
by the Michelin-starred restaurant

“Otsu-migaki” polished walls and high ceiling provide a sense of spaciousness. Annexed is a restaurant from which guests can enjoy a beautiful view of greenery outside the large windows.
The restaurant’s cuisine is overseen by the La Bombance restaurant in Nishiazabu, Tokyo, which has been Michelin-starred for ten consecutive years since 2008. La Bombance, which attracts gourmets in Tokyo and Hong Kong with creative cuisine, uses an abundance of ingredients from Kyoto to create original new dishes that can only be savored here. Based on traditional Japanese dishes, the restaurant daringly and freely wields its imagination beyond any given genre to produce elegance.
Guests staying at the hotel may enjoy the restaurant from breakfast through dinner. And since lunch and dinner are also served to people who are not staying with us, we look forward to seeing you in a variety of occasions, including dining with that special person or with friends, or when entertaining guests.

Guide Guide to the surroundings of “Sowaka”
for a feeling
of the spirit of Kyoto

  • Kodaiji Temple / Ishibekoji Alley

    We recommend a morning stroll here. Since there aren’t many people in Ishibekoji Alley in the morning, you can hear the whisking of brooms and people saying “good morning” to one another. There is a wonderful view from Kodaiji Temple. If you look up at the sky through the bargeboard roof, the day will begin refreshingly for you. Within the temple precincts you can try the tea ceremony and Zen (reservations required).

    Kodaiji Temple 6-minute walk

    Ishibekoji Alley 0-minute walk

  • Kiyomizudera Temple

    Kiyomizudera Temple, known for its “Kiyomizu Stage,” is a popular sightseeing spot. The place is crowded during the afternoon, and so if you are going there the morning is best. The temple’s surroundings are silent and you can occasionally see locals coming to scoop up the pure water. Here you can get a sense for everyday Kyoto and spend an invigorating time.
    15-minute walk
  • Fushimi Inari-taisha Shrine

    Take a visit Fushimi Inari-taisha, the head shrine of “Oinari-san” (the god Inari). Impressive is the path lined with thousands of vermillion torii gates. Lots of people stop to take a photograph here. Vermillion (“ake” in Japanese) can mean both “red” and “light” – that is to say, the word indicates bright hope. It is also a color that indicates the power of life, earth and birth, which is presided over by Inari-taisha
    25-minutes by taxi
  • Hanamikoji-dori Street

    Hanamikoji-dori Street, the center of Gion Kobu, one of the Five Hanamachi of Kyoto, is splendid for walking late at night. This street is quiet late at night, making the daytime noise seem unreal, and occasionally you will see maiko (dancing girls) pass by. A visit to Shirakawa, north of the hotel, is also a splendid experience. With the willow trees reflected on the surface of the river, you can hear the comforting murmur of the river.
    7-minute walk
  • Yasaka-jinja Shrine

    Right near Sowaka is “Yasaka-san,” famous for the Gion Festival in July. After the refined halberds are carried around the town, all disaster is collected and removed by portable shrines. Beside the Gion Festival there are other festivals held here each month, including Hatsuzakura Noh (Noh for the first cherry blossoms of the year), the Tanabata Star Festival and the Moon Viewing Festival, all of which are popular among the local people of Kyoto.
    3-minute walk
  • Hanamikoji-dori Street

    Hanamikoji-dori Street, the center of Gion Kobu, one of the Five Hanamachi of Kyoto, is splendid for walking late at night. This street is quiet late at night, making the daytime noise seem unreal, and occasionally you will see maiko (dancing girls) pass by. A visit to Shirakawa, north of the hotel, is also a splendid experience. With the willow trees reflected on the surface of the river, you can hear the comforting murmur of the river.
    7-minute walk
  • Kodaiji Temple / Ishibekoji Alley

    We recommend a morning stroll here. Since there aren’t many people in Ishibekoji Alley in the morning, you can hear the whisking of brooms and people saying “good morning” to one another. There is a wonderful view from Kodaiji Temple. If you look up at the sky through the bargeboard roof, the day will begin refreshingly for you. Within the temple precincts you can try the tea ceremony and Zen (reservations required).

    Kodaiji Temple 6-minute walk

    Ishibekoji Alley 0-minute walk

  • Kiyomizudera Temple

    Kiyomizudera Temple, known for its “Kiyomizu Stage,” is a popular sightseeing spot. The place is crowded during the afternoon, and so if you are going there the morning is best. The temple’s surroundings are silent and you can occasionally see locals coming to scoop up the pure water. Here you can get a sense for everyday Kyoto and spend an invigorating time.
    15-minute walk
  • Yasaka-jinja Shrine

    Right near Sowaka is “Yasaka-san,” famous for the Gion Festival in July. After the refined halberds are carried around the town, all disaster is collected and removed by portable shrines. Beside the Gion Festival there are other festivals held here each month, including Hatsuzakura Noh (Noh for the first cherry blossoms of the year), the Tanabata Star Festival and the Moon Viewing Festival, all of which are popular among the local people of Kyoto.
    3-minute walk
  • Fushimi Inari-taisha Shrine

    Take a visit Fushimi Inari-taisha, the head shrine of “Oinari-san” (the god Inari). Impressive is the path lined with thousands of vermillion torii gates. Lots of people stop to take a photograph here. Vermillion (“ake” in Japanese) can mean both “red” and “light” – that is to say, the word indicates bright hope. It is also a color that indicates the power of life, earth and birth, which is presided over by Inari-taisha
    25-minutes by taxi

Access / Contact

See the large map.
480 Kiyoi-cho,Yasaka Toriimae-sagaru,Shimogawara-dori,Higashiyama-ku,Kyoto 605-0821 JAPAN
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TEL:075-541-5323
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